Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice - current issue

Syndicate content
Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice - RSS feed of current issue
Updated: 16 hours 34 min ago

OHIM and national trade mark offices introduce common practice on the interpretation of black and white trade marks

Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:55

The Common Practice is a uniform approach adopted by the Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market (OHIM) and national trade mark offices to the issue of when a black and white (or greyscale) mark should be considered identical to another mark in respect of priority claims and in trade mark oppositions. The Common Practice also addresses when a mark registered in black and white but used in colour can be said to have been put to genuine use.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Don't touch my Ferrari! Unofficial fan clubs may infringe trade marks of their favourite sport teams

Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:55

The Italian Court of Cassation has ruled that a trade mark owner acquiesces in the use of his mark by a third party when he tolerates for five years such use and the third party registers that mark; accordingly, an unofficial fan club of a sport team that uses the mark of that team in the course of an economic activity, in which the trade mark owner did not acquiesce, might infringe that trade mark.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Inclarity and trade mark invalidity: IP translator considered

Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:55

The High Court has found that insufficient clarity of specification terms can be a ground of invalidity for trade mark registrations; that ‘telecommunications services’ properly encompass broadcasting services; and that in assessing intention to use invalidation, the customer experience is a consideration to be borne in mind.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Keeping it simple!!! Supreme Court of India streamlines patent revocation procedures

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

In a landmark decision, which should go a long way in streamlining the procedural aspects of patent litigation cases, the Supreme Court of India addressed the issue of multiplicity of proceedings in patent opposition, invalidation and revocation cases.

Categories: Local News Feeds

US Supreme Court relaxes standards for awarding attorney fees under 35 USC 285 in patent suits

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

On 29 April 2014 the US Supreme Court issued two companion decisions which overturned the long-standing jurisprudence of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (‘Federal Circuit’) regarding the standard for awarding attorney fees under 35 USC 285 and the deference given to the district court judge in making such a determination for patent cases.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Kornspitz: only the views of end users are relevant to establish if a trade mark has lost its distinctive character

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

The CJEU has held that, in order to establish whether a trade mark has become a common name for a given product, the perceptions of end users alone have to be taken into consideration.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Interpretation and application of national law in Community trade mark invalidity proceedings

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

The CJEU has confirmed that, in an action for the declaration of invalidity of a Community trade mark (CTM) based on the existence of an earlier right protected under national law, under Article 53(2)(c) of Regulation 207/2009 on the Community trade mark (CTMR), the competent OHIM bodies and the General Court must be able to ascertain the relevance of the evidence produced by the applicant to establish the content of the applicable national law, obtaining by their own motion, if necessary, any further information about its scope, content and interpretation. This principle, according to the court, stems from the necessity of ensuring the practical effect of the CTMR, and falls in line with the teaching of the judgment in Edwin v OHIM (C-263/09 P, EU:C:2011:452).

Categories: Local News Feeds

Interpreting concept of 'bad faith'

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

In Simca Europe Ltd v OHIM, the General Court upheld an Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market (OHIM) Board of Appeal decision declaring a Community trade mark (CTM) for the word SIMCA invalid, finding that the former proprietor of the word mark SIMCA, registered for vehicles, acted in bad faith when applying to register it. The court found that the Board had been entitled to take into account factors not previously listed in case law as criteria for the interpretation of the concept of ‘bad faith’, such as historical use of the mark and commercial logic for filing the CTM application.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Gold bear wars reloaded

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

Disagreeing with the first instance court, the Higher Regional Court of Cologne held that sweetmaker Lindt's three-dimensional gold-foiled chocolate bears did not infringe Haribo's well-known GOLDBÄREN gummy bear (word) trade marks.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Balancing tool or escape clause? Proportionality in temporary relief proceedings before the Greek courts

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

A recent judgment of the Athens First Instance Court in preliminary injunction proceedings over trade mark infringement illustrates how the principle of proportionality may be (mis-)used.

Categories: Local News Feeds

First Amendment trumps couple's right of publicity; copyright claim to proceed

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

A federal district judge dismissed the right of publicity claim of a couple whose engagement photograph had been used without permission by an organization to promote anti-gay speech, while the copyright claim of the photographer who took the picture was allowed to proceed.

Categories: Local News Feeds

A 'blink blink eye rub' does not amount to passing off

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

Moroccanoil Israel Ltd (MIL) failed in its passing off claim against Aldi; although Aldi's packaging was deliberately similar to MIL's packaging, there was no evidence of customers being deceived as to their economic origin.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Safe and sound: CJEU confirms a safener can be an active ingredient too

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

The CJEU has confirmed the broader interpretation of ‘active substance’ proposed by AG Jääskinen (EU:C:2014:86) in the context of supplementary protection certificates (SPCs) for plant protection products—will this decision result in a move away from the strict approach previously applied in relation to SPCs for medicinal products?.

Categories: Local News Feeds

The competition law treatment of no-challenge clauses in licence agreements: an unfortunate revolution?

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

Sophie Lawrance is a senior associate at London law firm, Bristows LLP, where she specialises in EU and competition law. She has a particular interest in working with businesses in the technology and pharmaceutical sectors, and in relation to the competition issues that arise in connection with standardised technology.

Sophie is a regular contributor to www.bristowsclipboard.com, a legal blog commenting on issues around the competition law/IP interface.

This article looks at the Commission's treatment of no-challenge provisions in licence agreements. The new technology transfer rules, which came into force on 1 May 2014, adopt a stricter approach to such provisions than was previously the case.

The Commission's new approach is driven by a policy objective of ensuring that invalid patents are revoked. This article considers the implications of this policy, as well as competing policies such as freedom of contract.

Finally, the article considers the intended and unintended consequences of the Commission's new policy in this area.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Are blocking injunctions against ISPs allowed in Europe? Copyright enforcement in the post-Telekabel EU legal landscape

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

In recent years, the national courts of the EU Member States, in an attempt to stem the flow of rampant online copyright infringement, have increasingly turned to the issuance of blocking injunctions against the intermediaries whose websites and networks are used by third parties to commit infringements. This article examines the legal framework in place at the EU level with regard to the legality of such injunctive orders, making a distinction between filtering measures, used to detect copyright infringements, and blocking measures, used to put an end to them. On the basis of that analysis, a detailed examination will be made of the latest CJEU ruling to apply this framework, Case C-314/12, UPC Telekabel Wien GmbH v Constantin Film Verleih GmbH on the lawfulness of open-ended blocking injunctions against internet access providers.

Categories: Local News Feeds

The draft national Intellectual Property Policy proposals for improving South Africa's patent registration system: a review

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

This article discusses South Africa's draft Intellectual Property Policy's proposed reforms. It considers how these may be practically implemented. In particular, it focuses on the phased sector specific introduction of substantive patent examination, possible co-operation with other national or regional patent offices to enhance examination capacity, the retention of non-examination for utility or second tier patents and the involvement of third parties in the examination process. It also considers the re-introduction of opposition proceedings to further strengthen the patent system. The article points to other jurisdictions that have implemented some of these options such as Australia's utility patent system, the successful implementation of the peer-to-patent project in countries such as the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) and opposition proceedings in Europe, the UK and Australia. It concludes that these are plausible and viable options that ought to be further explored for adaptation to the South African context.

The article will be of interest to those following policy and legislative developments in the developing world and particularly Sub-Saharan Africa, where change often begins in South Africa then extends throughout the region as neighbouring states follow South Africa's lead.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Trade marks as a reflection

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

In the article, the trade mark is put in the context of the theory of reflection, known amongst philosophers. In the first part of the article, it is considered in purely material aspect. If we assume that a certain object has a materialist expression and is a product, which is on the market in the form of goods, and these goods have a conceptual expression in the form of a trade mark, then that trade mark is a subjective image of the very object–product-goods. It is a question if each conceptual expression would be protected as a trade mark. Examples are given for decisions of experts in The Guidelines concerning proceedings before the OHIM (trade marks and designs) Part B, Examination, Section 4, Absolute Grounds for Refusal. In the second part of the article, the trade mark is considered out of the materialist concept of existence. It is in relation with the world round us. It is shown how the choice of a given name of a trade mark of goods or service may be influenced by events of various origins or how ‘the change causes changes’.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Celebrity image rights versus public interest: striking the right balance under German law

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

This article analyses the background and latest developments in the case-law in Germany which deals with the commercial exploitation of an individual's personality as a special form of manifestation of the general right of personality. It will be considered how the German Federal Court of Justice strikes the balance between legitimate public interest in a celebrities' personality and a mere business interest. As the debate about the recognition of image rights in the UK is gathering momentum in the wake of the recent decision of the UK High Court of Justice which considered Rihanna, the pop star, and the clothes chain Topshop and the unauthorised use of Rihanna's image on T-shirts, this article will be of real interest to legal practitioners and academics concerned with comparative law and the protection of personality and image rights in Germany.

Categories: Local News Feeds

Staying well away from initial interest confusion

Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:54

Trade mark law is essentially concerned with protecting consumers and trade mark proprietors against confusion. It has been assumed in a number of countries including Singapore that the likelihood of confusion is to be determined at the time of sale or purchase. This is because it is at that point in time that the purchase of goods is consummated by the consumer (and hence confusion takes effect) and damage to the proprietor occurs. The assumption is displaced by the "initial interest confusion" doctrine which posits that there can be a likelihood of pre-sale, or initial, confusion on the part of potential purchasers, even though the defendant's mark is not likely to cause mistaken purchases. The Singapore Court of Appeal has recently expressed concerns regarding the doctrine. It said that the doctrine would not only extend the protection of trade mark beyond its origin-based premise but can also stifle competition and access to information without any corresponding benefit to consumers.

Categories: Local News Feeds